About

On 25/8/1991, Linus Torvalds wrote:
"Hello everybody out there using minix - I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones."

In 1991 when Linus Torvalds launched Linux he did not only give a free operating system but gave scope for a new group of developers to evolve making software development to a hobby. Example distros such as Slackware, Debian, Red Hat and other so-called major distros, resulted from this change in software development.


Professional -> Amateur (dev) -> End-user developer (eudev).

Linux gave scope for a new group of developers to evolve making software development to a hobby.

LFS and other Linux from scratch style of distros made it possible for end users to become developers.


The creation of new developers didn't stop at the amateur developers developing distros or other advance programs. Free software is for all whoever is interested in the work of development if then for own usage or Linux/BSD community. LFS and other Linux from scratch style of distros made it possible for end users to become developers. One of the leading distro in this line is Gentoo Linux where users get to learn how to optimize and know the system and configure of Linux.

Arch Linux made end users' contributions as a part of it's development. Of course there is always a limit. Any distro having aim and objectives cannot accommodate every contribution. It would not be fair if they do i.e. there are just too many ideas and likings among end users.
"There are two sides in Arch Linux: (1) Developer and (2) User contributions. Don't expect the two sides to merge but to have a mutual relation where anyone can pickup what they want to add in their machine." (Rasatmakananda, AMLUG).

When distros having limited sources to accommodate or support all kind of user contributions many interesting and useful programs get lost. They may not be useful or important for a particular distro but there are other distros and end users who may like or are searching for a program someone has developed somewhere. Most important though many are not aware, end users want to contribute because its natural when getting something for free. With some help and learning the basic they can start contibuting.
"To give a little something back to the free software community, since I've taken so much." (Judd Vinet, Arch Linux).

Features and Benefits

Quote: ""The great thing about contributions is that you don't need anyone's permission to make them. No one can physically stop you from writing something that you (personally) find useful, even if the "powers that be" don't see it as a blessing. Write it and put it up in the User Contributions forum. If other people like it, you will receive feedback. If virtually everyone out there hates it but you, who cares? It took you 20 minutes to write, and you learned something along the way, and now you can convert slack packages. It's a winning situation no matter what". (Judd Vinet, Arch Linux)

The Final Word

What more to say.... welcome if you feel here is a place where you can apply your ideas or learn more about programming or simply hang around for new things.